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Shocking Diseases That Eye Doctors Find First cont.

By the physicians of The Doctors
Also published in Reader’s Digest Magazine February 2014

Hosts of the hit TV show “The Doctors” share surprising information about what your eye doctor might discover about your blood pressure, cancer and more.

Cancer

eye cancerAn eye exam may save your life.  We can find everything from brain  tumors to breast and lung cancers that have spread to the eye, says Joseph Pizzimenti, an optometrist and associate professor at Nova Southeastern University College of  Optometry Eye Care Institute in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Certain types of bleeding in the retina can signal leukemia. Eye doctors can diagnose brain tumors based on changes in a patient’s field of vision. Malignant melanoma can strike in back of the eye, and patients often don’t know it is there  unless the cancer is in the very center of their field of vision, Pizzimenti says.

Watch for next week’s blog for more on diseases that Eye Doctors find.

 

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Shocking Diseases That Eye Doctors Find First

By the physicians of The Doctors
Also published in Reader’s Digest Magazine February 2014

Hosts of the hit TV show “The Doctors” share surprising information about what your eye doctor might discover about your blood pressure, cancer and more.

Blood pressure? Check. Weight? Check. Pee in a cup? Check. Seeing an eye doctor regularly?

Eye ExamPatients may be caught off guard if their doctor asks the last question during an annual checkup. Here’s why we inquire. The retina, or the back of the eye, is the only place in your body that gives doctors a close-up view of your blood vessels and nerves without your needing to  be cut open. This makes a routine eye exam very useful for detecting  important medical issues at their earliest stages. We at “The Doctors” asked some of  our trusted eye-care experts to tell  us which conditions they may help  diagnose during your regular exam.
Check next week’s blog for more information. 

 

 

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Shocking Diseases That Eye Doctors Find First cont.

By the physicians of The Doctors
Also published in Reader’s Digest Magazine February 2014

Hosts of the hit TV show “The Doctors” share surprising information about what your eye doctor might discover about your blood pressure, cancer and more.

High blood pressure

blood pressureBlood vessel damage, including weakening and narrowing of the  arteries, can signal high blood  pressure, says Jessica Ciralsky, MD, assistant professor of ophthalmology at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. Multiple large-scale studies have found links between heart disease and narrowing of small blood vessels in the retina, according to a paper in the American Journal of Medicine. These connections are particularly strong in people without traditional heart disease risk factors.

 

Watch for next week’s blog for more on diseases that Eye Doctors find.

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February is AMD/Low Vision Awareness Month

Posted: Monday, February 4, 2008 12:00 am

BY GAIL M WILLIAMS

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one of the leading causes of legal blindness and vision impairment in older Americans. According to Prevent Blindness America, 1.6 million people over the age of 50 are affected by AMD.

AMD occurs with degeneration of the macula, the part of the retina responsible for sharp, central vision. Because the macula primarily is affected in AMD, central vision loss may occur.

The chronic eye disease can progress slowly or rapidly. People over 50 years of age, people with hypertension, smokers and those with a family history of AMD are especially at risk for the disease.

Because no pain is associated with AMD, it is vital that people with the following symptoms see their eye specialist immediately.

  • straight lines appear wavy
  • Difficulty seeing at a distance
  • Decreased ability to distinguish colors
  • Inability to see details such as faces or words in a book
  • Dark or Empty spots block the center of your vision

 

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January is Glaucoma Awareness Month

“Currently, 2.7 million people in the United States over age 40 have glaucoma, one of the leading causes of blindness in the U.S., yet understanding and awareness of the disease is still relatively low, according to data from the AOA’s 2013 American Eye-Q® consumer survey.”

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Do You Have Eye Strain From Being On The Computer?

Read this article published by Vision Monday.  Contact us today if you have eye strain from Digital Devices.  We offer a variety of Computer Lenses and the Anti Reflective to help block the blue-violet light.

http://www.visionmonday.com/latest-news/article/impact-of-digital-media-on-vision-health-is-topic-of-vision-councils-report-and-booth-at-international-ces-1/

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Braille

brailleWorld Braille Day on Saturday, January 4th. This day is celebrated world wide recognizing Louis Braille.  It is the birth date  of Louis Braille, the one who invented the system so that blind people could  read and write.  Louis became blind at age 3. He was a very intelligent boy and by the time he was 15, he created the alphabet only using 6 raised dots.  This changed the world for the blind people across the world.

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WELCOME

We welcome 2014 in less than 24 hours!  Don’t forget to schedule your comprehensive eye exam today!

Happy New Year!!2014

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Enjoy

Christmas 2013Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from all of us at Gregor Eye Care!!

We hope you enjoy your holiday with your Family and Friends!

 

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3 reasons comprehensive exams matter for diabetes

More than 8 percent of the American population has diabetes. For this large group of at-risk patients, regular dilated eye exams are critical to prevent vision loss.

Because of the damage the disease can do to the retina and other parts of the eye, optometrists should stress the need for regular eye care with these patients. Below are three reasons why.

1. Their risk is higher

People with diabetes have a significantly higher risk for developing eye diseases.

Patients with diabetes are 40 percent more likely to suffer from glaucoma than people without diabetes. They’re 60 percent more likely to develop cataracts, and they tend to get them at a younger age and with faster disease progression. And diabetic retinopathy is one of the most serious sight-threatening complications of diabetes.

2. Symptoms may be invisible

According to the AOA’s 2013 American Eye-Q® consumer survey, only 32 percent of respondents are aware that diabetic eye disease often has no visual signs or symptoms. That is all the more reason to stress the need for regular exams, said Tina MacDonald, O.D., a Certified Diabetes Educator and a member of the AOA’s Health Promotions Committee.

“Many eye problems show no symptoms until they are in an advanced stage, and that is why we recommend that people with diabetes in particular have an eye examination by a doctor of optometry at least once a year,” Dr. MacDonald said.

3. Early detection matters

Comprehensive exams can help detect disease early—and thereby limit the damage diabetes does to the eyes.

“When the eyes are dilated, an eye doctor is able to examine the retina for signs of diabetic eye disease and prescribe a course of treatment to help preserve an individual’s sight,” Dr. MacDonald said.

In addition to the recommendation for regular exams, optometrists should encourage high-risk patients to contact them if any of the following symptoms are present:

  • Sudden blurred or double vision
  • Trouble reading or focusing on near-work
  • Eye pain or pressure
  • A noticeable aura or dark ring around lights or illuminated objects
  • Visible dark spots in vision or images of flashing lights

*From Eye Care Advances 11/15/13

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